Belief Statement

  • The Board of Education of Troy Community Consolidated School District 30C is committed to providing a learning environment that supports and promotes wellness, good nutrition, and an active lifestyle and recognizes the positive relationship between good nutrition, physical activity and the capacity of students to develop and learn. The entire school environment shall be aligned with healthy school goals to positively influence students’ beliefs and habits and promote health and wellness, good nutrition and regular physical activity. In addition, school staff shall be encouraged to model healthy eating and physical activity as a valuable part of daily life.  

Wellness Committee

  • The Troy CCSD 30-C Wellness Committee is under the oversight of the Director of Finance.  The Committee currently consists of administrators, parents, food service management company representatives, athletic department representative, and a school nurse.  The Committee meets at least four times per year, and has the following goals: 

    •    Ensure that the Wellness Policy is updated to current requirements from the State Board of Education (language is to be assessed every three years, at a minimum.)
    •    Ensure the Wellness Policy is posted on the District’s website.
    •    Encourage all interested parties to participate on the Wellness Committee.  Parents, staff, and board members are all welcome to participate.  Anyone interested in joining the Committee should contact Kristine Hutten, Director of Finance, at khutten@troy30c.org, or call 815-577-6760 ext. 4720.

Intent

  • The purpose of these guidelines is to ensure a total school environment that promotes and supports student health and wellness, helps to reduce childhood obesity and meets the requirements of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 and the Illinois School Code, including, without limitation, goals for nutrition education, physical activity and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness; nutrition guidelines for all foods available during the school day; a plan for measuring implementation including designating one or more persons charged with operational responsibility. 

Goals for Nutrition Education

  • Students in kindergarten through grade 8 shall receive nutrition education as part of a sequential program that is coordinated within a comprehensive health education curriculum. The program shall be designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to adopt healthy eating behaviors and aimed at influencing students’ knowledge, attitudes and eating habits. Special emphasis should be placed on nutrition education in preschool through primary grades as eating habits are established at a young age. The curriculum shall be consistent with and incorporate relevant Illinois Learning Standards.

Goals for Physical Activity

    • Students in kindergarten through grade 8 shall participate in daily physical activities that enable them to achieve and maintain a high level of personal fitness; emphasizes self-management skills including energy balance (calories in minus calories out); and is coordinated within a comprehensive health education curriculum. The curriculum shall be consistent with and incorporate relevant Illinois Learning Standards. 

    • Schools shall provide a daily supervised recess period to K-4 students. 

    • Students shall be provided opportunities for physical activity through a range of before- and after-school programs including intramurals, interscholastic athletics, and physical activity clubs.

Goals for Other School-Based Activities Designed to Promote Student Wellness

  • Healthy Eating 

    • It is recommended that food providers share information about the nutritional content of school meals and/or individually sold foods. 

    • School meals shall be served in clean, safe and pleasant settings with adequate time provided for students to eat, at a minimum, in accordance with state and federal standards and guidelines. The National Association of State Boards of Education recommends that students have adequate time to eat, relax and socialize: at least 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch. 

    • Students, parents, school staff and community members bringing foods and beverages to school for parties/celebrations/meetings are to provide healthful options and are provided a list of food and beverage options (Attachment B). 

    • Schools take efforts to promote nutritious food and beverage choices consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Food Guidance System (MyPyramid) such as fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and whole grain products. 

    • All foods and beverages made available are to comply with the federal, state and local food safety and sanitation regulations. In order to comply with these regulations, all foods and beverages are to be purchased as “packaged” through an outside vendor. Due to the significant number of students with allergies, foods prepared in the home may result in cross-contamination and are forbidden.

    Physical Activity 

    • Physical education shall be provided by trained and well-supported staff that is certified by the state to teach physical education. 

    • Schools are encouraged to develop community partnerships with other child-serving organizations such as park districts and YMCA’s to provide students with opportunities to be active. 

    • Physical activity facilities and equipment on school grounds shall be safe. 

    • School personnel shall be encouraged to use nonfood incentives or rewards with students and shall not withhold food from students as punishment.

Celebrating with Non-Edible Treats

  • It is recommended that parents provide non-edible treats for a child’s classmates if they are celebrating an occasion. Examples of non-edible treats are: pencils, erasers, bookmarks, stickers, crayons, etc.

Nutrition Guidelines for all Foods and Beverages Available in School during the School Day

  • Food providers shall offer a variety of age-appropriate, appealing foods and beverage choices and employ food preparation, purchasing and meal planning practices consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (e.g. provide a variety of fruits and vegetable choices; serve low-fat and fat-free dairy products; ensure that whole grain products are served).

Guidelines for School Meals

  • School meals served shall be consistent with the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and/or shall meet, at a minimum, the nutrition requirements and regulations for the National School Lunch Program and all applicable state and local laws and regulations.

Dietary Guidelines for American Nutrition Standards 

  • These criteria focus on decreasing fat and added sugar, increasing nutrient density, and moderating portion size.

    Fruits and Non-Fried Vegetables

    Fruits and vegetables may be fresh, frozen, canned or dried, and they must be found in the Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs. 

    Examples of products that cannot be sold/served as a fruit or vegetable include: 

    • Snack-type foods made from vegetables or fruits, such as potato chips, and banana chips; 

    • Pickle relish, jam, jelly; and 

    • Tomato catsup and chili sauce

    Approved Beverages

    • Flavored or plain reduced fat (2%), low-fat (1%), skim/nonfat fluid milk meeting State and local standards for pasteurized fluid milk and/or USDA approved alternative dairy beverages; 

    • 100% full-strength fruit and vegetable juices; and

    • Water (non-flavored, non-sweetened, and non-carbonated)

    Any Other Individual Food 
    Sales/Service

    • Calories from total fat must be at or below 35%. This is determined by dividing the calories from total fat by the total calories and multiplying by 100. If calories from fat are not available, multiply the grams of fat by 9 to equal calories from fat.

    • Calories from saturated fat must be at or below 10%. This is determined by dividing the calories from saturated fat by the total calories and multiplying by 100. If calories from saturated fat are not available, multiply grams of saturated fat by 9 to equal calories from saturated fat.

    • Total sugar must be at or below 35% by weight. This is determined by dividing the grams of total sugar by the gram weight of the product and multiplying by 100. This includes both naturally occurring and added sugars. This limit does not include fruits and vegetables or flavored milk as defined above.

    • Portion size for a la carte sales in the school cafeteria is not to exceed the serving size of the food served in the National School Lunch Program/School Breakfast Program.

Healthful Food and Beverage Options for School Functions

  • At any school function (parties, celebrations, meetings, etc.), healthful food options are to be made available to promote student, staff and community wellness. The following list of nutritious food and beverages are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and are the only food and beverages allowed at school parties, to be sent to school for student birthdays, and/or any celebrations. 

    All foods and beverages are to comply with the federal, state and local food safety and sanitation regulations. In order to comply with these regulations, all foods and beverages are to be purchased as “packaged” through an outside vendor. Due to the significant number of students with allergies, foods prepared in the home may result in cross-contamination and are forbidden. 

     

    • Raw vegetable sticks/slices with low-fat dressing or yogurt dip 

    • Fresh fruit wedges – cantaloupe, honey dew, watermelon, pineapple, oranges, tangelos, etc. 

    • Sliced fruit – nectarines, peaches, kiwi, star fruit, plums, pears, mangos, apples, etc. 

    • Fruit salad 

    • Cereal and low-fat milk 

    • 100% fruit or vegetable juice 

    • Frozen fruit pops with fruit juice or fruit as the first ingredient 

    • Dried fruits – raisins, cranberries, apples, apricots 

    • Single serving applesauce or canned fruit in juice 

    • Fruit smoothies made with fat-free or low-fat milk 

    • Lean meats and reduced fat cheese sandwiches (use light or reduced fat mayonnaise in chicken/tuna salads) 

    • Pretzels or reduced fat crackers 

    • Baked chips with salsa or low-fat dip (Ranch, onion, bean, etc.) 

    • Mini bagels with whipped light or fat-free cream cheese 

    • Pasta salad 

    • Bread sticks with marinara 

    • Fat-free or low-fat flavored yogurt & fruit parfaits 

    • Fat-free or low-fat pudding cups 

    • Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products (string cheese, single-serving cottage cheese, cheese cubes) 

    • Flavored soy milk fortified with calcium 

    • Pure ice cold water 

    • No sugar added applesauce 

    • Baby carrots and ranch dip 

    • Wheat crackers and string cheese 

    • Mini bagels and cream cheese 

    • Pretzels 

    • Animal crackers 

    • Graham Crackers 

    • White cheddar popcorn (Smart Pop brand) 

    • Apple slices w/ or w/o caramel dip 

    • Cheese and breadsticks 

    • Wheat bread with low-sugar or no-sugar added fruit spread/jelly 

    • Bananas